Wednesday December 2, 2009

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – This is a favorite subject of mine: Mies van der Rohe’s iconic Seagram building.  You’ll see this building again on this blog.   The space defined by the Seagram building, its plaza and the Racquet and Tennis Club across Park Avenue is one of the outstanding urban spaces in New York.  This is from the balcony of the Racquet and Tennis Club.  It’s about 5:30 PM so most offices are still illuminated.

Technically this image was stitched from four separate images shot with my Leica M9 and a 35 mm Summicron Asph. lens.  Images were stitched with PTGui Pro software.

Seagram building
Seagram building

Tuesday December 1, 2009

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – We attend a Piemontese white truffle dinner at the James Beard Foundation, hosted by Joe and Paul Bartolotta.  I’ve edited this post – on reflection I like the image below better than the one originally posted.

By the way I’ve made some changes to the site.  I’ve added three additional galleries under “Parties” and a gallery called Fireworks.  I’ve also added a star rating system.  This is an experiment – I’ll be working over the next few months to refine it.  Feel free to click on the stars at the top of each post to cast a vote on it.

White truffle dinner at the James Beard Foundation
White truffle dinner at the James Beard Foundation

Monday November 30, 2009

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – This is a good time of the year to photograph New York in the dark – it gets dark early, around 5:00 PM.  Buildings are fully illuminated because workers are still at their desks at this hour.  Today we walked in the Lincoln Center to Columbus Circle area.

Traffic - Columbus Circle
Traffic - Columbus Circle

Sunday November 29, 2009

LITCHFIELD, CONNECTICUT – Back to Litchfield to photograph the First Congregational Church at sunrise.  The congregation first met in 1721.  The story of the building is a bit complex.  Here’s a quote from “Historic Buildings of Connecticut”:

Litchfield’s first meeting house was built on the Green in 1723, the second in 1761 and the third in 1829. In 1873, a fourth church, in the High Victorian Gothic style, was built and the 1829 Federal-style structure, with its steeple removed as was typically done with deconsecrated churches, was moved around the corner. In the coming years it would serve as a community center and theater, known as Amory Hall or Colonial Hall. In the early twentieth century, tastes had shifted back from favoring the Gothic to an interest in the Colonial Revival. In 1929, the Gothic church was demolished and the 1828 church returned to its original site on Torrington Road and restored, complete with a new steeple (1929-30). Reconsecrated, it continues today as the First Congregational Church of Litchfield.”

I’ve taken the liberty of presenting this image in both color and black and white.  The black and white version demonstrates the power of abstraction of this medium.

This images was captured with a Leica M9 digital camera, and a fifty-year old Leitz lens, a 50mm dual range Summicron modified to mount on the M9.  The finished image was stitched together from four overlapping frames, which provides resolution similar to a medium format digital camera or 4×5 film.

The time on the clock on the steeple could either be an hour slow or perpetually 6:30 – it’s actually the latter.

First Congregational Church Litchfield Connecticut
First Congregational Church Litchfield Connecticut
Black and white version
Black and white version