Wednesday January 12, 2011

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – I spent the morning in a snow-covered Central Park. A few interesting images. Here’s a view of the El Dorado, one of three large building on Central Park West built by Emory Roth (the others are the Beresford and the San Remo). This is a common angle on the building, across the Central Park Reservoir. Two frames taken with my Hasselblad H4D-60, with a 300 mm lens on a monopod. This is another example of how well this camera’s files convert to black and white.

El Dorado
El Dorado

On this day one year ago: From Bryant Park.

Prom Bryant Park

Tuesday January 11, 2011

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – I spent most of the day in the office. Fortunately in the late afternoon there was a moment when the light was wonderful, so I caught this image looking south from 919 Third Avenue with my Leica M9 and 35mm Summilux II lens. It’s two frames stitched.

South from 919 Third Avenue
South from 919 Third Avenue

On this day last year: Dinner at Le Bernardin.

Le Bernardin

Monday January 10, 2011

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – I had breakfast at Kitchenette in Harlem this morning with Francesca, our daughter. It’s a sure sign that the transformation of Harlem is complete when a restaurant from Tribeca opens a branch there. I had a Rodchenko moment on the elevated subway platform on the way back downtown. I’ve also included an image from Kitchenette. Both taken with my Leica M9 and a 35mm Summilux II lens. In daylight I’m shooting with a .9 neutral density filter (three f-stops) with this lens so I can shoot f/1.4 with narrow depth of field. I’m not certain that this works on the faux Rodchenko – I like it better at the Kitchenette.

125th Street
125th Street
Kitchenette
Kitchenette

On this day one year ago: Old town hall, Morris Connecticut. Another favorite of mine from last year.

Morris CT Historical Society

Sunday January 9. 2011

WARREN CONNECITCUT – I’ve been experimenting with tilts and shifts on my Hasselblad with an HTS 1.5 tilt/shift adapter. One of the traditional reasons to tilt the lens on a view camera is to extend depth of field by tilting the focus plane; the technique is known as the Scheimpflug principle. I’ve been struggling with getting accurate focus with the HTS 1.5 so I’ve gone back to an alternative digital solution to the problem of extending depth of field, focus stacking. The idea is to take multiple images with the focus point shifted slightly from image and stack the images in specialized software to achieve an image that in focus throughout. See my post for January 4, 2011.

Here’s an image taken with my Hasselblad H4D and an HC 300 mm lens. I used the long lens to obtain compression in the image and to compose it to my taste. The 300 mm lens has shallow depth of field, even when stopped down, and there are image quality issues with stopping down to extreme levels. So I took 9 frames moving the focus plane through the image, and stacked them in Helicon Focus. The process is relatively painless as long as you have a lot of computing power. As I’ve noted previously black and white conversions from the Hasselblad are more like large format film than any other camera that I’ve used since I started with digital.

Wind blown snow, Warren Connecitcut
Wind blown snow, Warren Connecitcut

On this day one year ago: Snow drifts! How about that. Also taken with my Hasselblad. I guess this demonstrates that there are only so many landscape subject to photograph when the landscape is covered by snow. I prefer this year’s effort.

Warren snow drifts

Saturday January 8, 2011

WARREN CONNECTICUT – We had a heavy snowfall Friday night so we stayed in Manhattan and drove up to Warren on Saturday morning. There had been very little wind so the snow stayed where it fell on tree limbs etching them against a darker background. I stopped at a rest stop on I 684 North of Goldens Bridge New York. Ok but not splendid photographs. When we arrived in Warren I captured this with my Hasselblad H4D-60 and a 300 mm lens.

Warren Connecticut
Warren Connecticut

On this day last year: An “out my window” in good light.

From 1185 Park Avenue

Friday January 7, 2010

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – I left the apartment early this morning to run some errands, camera in hand. There was a light snowfall that progressed to a full fledged storm. As I left our building’s courtyard I noticed that the view back through the entrance might be of interest. Odd. I’ve lived here for a long time and this hadn’t occurred to me. On the way back I stopped on the Park Avenue island, and took this with my Leica M9 and a 90mm Elmarit lens:

1185 Park Avenue in snow storm
1185 Park Avenue in snow storm

One this day last year: Restaurant construction Old Fulton Street, Brooklyn. This looks more interesting to me with a year’s perspective.

Construction Old Fulton Street